Reasons For Foreign Investment

Reasons For Foreign Investment : Investment Solution Manual.

Reasons For Foreign Investment

reasons for foreign investment

    foreign investment

  • Lending to or purchasing ownership shares in a foreign enterprise largely owned and controlled by the investor (direct investment) or in a foreign enterprise not owned or controlled by the investor (portfolio investment).
  • shall have the meaning specified in Section 9.13.
  • Foreign direct investment (FDI) refers to long term participation by country A into country B. It usually involves participation in management, joint-venture, transfer of technology and expertise.

    reasons

  • “Beginning” is Kotipelto’s first single released in 2004 through Century Media.
  • Who You Fighting For? is an album released by UB40 on July 18, 2005. The album was nominated for the reggae album Grammy in 2006 . It marks the return of the rootsier, political sound that the group cultivated during the early 1980s. It was the band’s first release by Rhino Records in the US.
  • A cause, explanation, or justification for an action or event
  • Reasons is an album by the Finnish folk music group Angelit, released in 2003 in Finland. The musical tracks consist mainly of traditional Sámi yoiking.
  • A premise of an argument in support of a belief, esp. a minor premise when given after the conclusion
  • Good or obvious cause to do something

Indian Foreign Service (IFS)

Indian Foreign Service (IFS)
The Indian Foreign Service (IFS) is one of the important Services of the Government of India; other important services being Indian Administrative Service (IAS), Indian Police Service (IPS), Indian Forest Service (IFS) and Indian Revenue Service (IRS).
In September 1946, on the eve of India’s independence, the Government of India decided to create a service called the Indian Foreign Service for India’s diplomatic, consular and commercial representation overseas.

The precursor to Indian Foreign Service can be traced back to September 1783 when Foreign Department was established by the British Raj to conduct business with foreign European powers. In 1947, there was a near seamless transformation of the Foreign department of the British India government into what then became the new Ministry of External Affairs and in 1948 the first batch recruited under the combined Civil service examination system of the Union Public Service Commission joined the service. This system of entry has remained the staple mode of intake into the IFS to this day.

The Indian Foreign Service is not one of the All India Services but still enjoys an equivalent status. The three types of civil services in India are the All India Services, Central Services and State Services. It belongs to the Central Services.

The origin of the Indian Foreign Service can be traced back to the British rule when the Foreign Department was created to conduct business with the “Foreign European Powers”. In fact it was on September 13, 1783, when the Board of Directors of the East India Company passed a resolution at Fort William, Calcutta (now Kolkata), to create a department, which could help “relieve the pressure” on the Warren Hastings administration in conducting its “secret and political business”. Subsequently known as the “Indian Foreign Department”, it went ahead with the expansion of diplomatic representation, wherever necessary, to protect British interests.

In 1843, Governor-General Ellenborough carried out administrative reforms under which the Secretariat of the Government was organized under four departments – Foreign, Home, Finance and Military. Each was headed by a Secretary level officer. The foreign department Secretary was entrusted with the “conduct of all correspondence belonging to the external and internal diplomatic relations of the government”.

From the very beginning, a distinction was maintained between the “foreign” and “political” functions of the Foreign Department; relations with all “Asiatic powers” (including native princely states of India during the British Raj) were treated as “political” and with all European powers as “foreign”.

Although the Government of India Act, 1935 sought to delineate more clearly functions of the “Foreign” and “Political” wings of the Foreign Department, it was soon realized that it was administratively imperative to completely bifurcate the Foreign department. Consequently, the External Affairs Department was set up separately under the direct charge of the Governor-General.

The idea of establishing a separate diplomatic service to handle the external activities of the Government of India originated from a note dated September 30, 1944, recorded by Lt-Gen T. J. Hutton, Secretary, Planning and Development Department of the Government. When this note was referred to the Department of External Affairs for comments, Olaf Caroe, the Foreign Secretary, recorded his comments in an exhaustive note detailing the scope, composition and functions of the proposed service. Mr Caroe pointed out that as India emerged to a position of autonomy and national consciousness, it was imperative to build up a system of representation abroad that would be in complete harmony with the objectives of the future government.

In September 1946, on the eve of India’s independence, the Government of India decided to create a service called the Indian Foreign Service for India’s diplomatic, consular and commercial representation overseas.

In 1947, there was a near seamless transformation of the Foreign and Political department of the British India government into what then became the new Ministry of External Affairs and Commonwealth Relations[1] and in 1948 the first batch recruited under the combined Civil service examination system of the Union Public Service Commission joined the service. This system of entry has remained the staple mode of intake into the IFS to this day.

The officials of the IFS are selected by the Union Public Service Commission through a three-stage combined selection process called the Civil Services Examination, known for being extremely challenging, that recruits officers for 20 other Group A services and five Group B services. The first stage, the Civil Services Prelims is composed of two objective exams: one of General studies and one of a subject of one’s choice amongst a given list of subjects. The candidates can choose to be examined in about forty fields, from Civil Engineering and Med

Mr. K.P. Fabian, Indian Foreign Service (1964)

Mr. K.P. Fabian, Indian Foreign Service (1964)
K.P. FABIAN, former Ambassador to Qatar, Finland and other nations, hails from Kochi and has been in the Indian Foreign Service since 1964, finally retiring in 2000 as Ambassador to Italy. Mr. Fabian was in the city for a talk on his book `The Common Sense on the War on Iraq’. He took some time off to speak to TANYA ABRAHAM.

"Imust say that my experience as a foreign diplomat was enriching and much knowledge regarding various cultures and traditions were acquired, not to mention the large circle of friends.

"During my tenure as a foreign diplomat, I do not recall any difficulties, perhaps because I was not in Pakistan or China. Nevertheless, the fact that we are a developing nation has on occasions created the need to be forthright and frank. There often occurs this preconceived notion that a country like India, which is not a developed nation, is devoid of opinions. I remember an incident after our nuclear tests were conducted, when the Italian government had asked me to sign an agreement stating the reversal of these tests for which I had replied that the information would be passed on as per my duty, yet I did question them as to on what basis they believed that the Indian Government would actually adhere to this. For some reason, it is expected of developing nations to blindly follow the requests of the more powerful countries; I think my associate diplomat was quite taken aback with my answer.

"As far as our current foreign policy is concerned, I feel that it is too `American oriented.’ The entire approach is concerning how it is going to affect our relations with America, which is not the right approach. It is not a positive approach; we need a policy from a broad perspective of national consensus for it to be a fruitful policy.

"Besides, for the future of India on the whole, what the Government needs to focus on is a reasonable standard of living for its people, so that they have autonomy over their lives. We need to create a materialistic base so that talents can come forth, for which we need to focus on primary education and the elimination of illiteracy on the whole.

"At the moment, I don’t think our Government is doing enough and our policies are not right. India has sufficient resources to take care of her interests; however still, foreign investments should always be welcome.

Basically, there is the need to restructure our policies and we as Indians need to elect better leaders, for bureaucracy has always been a stumbling block."

The Hindu 21/07/2003

reasons for foreign investment
Advertisements
Comments are closed.